Windows Phone Design Day Recordings

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If you are a developer or designer looking to target Windows Phone, this is a must-watch series.  If you hold any kind of role related to software visual and interactive design, this should still be a great series for you to watch.

Ana and Miles, the Windows Phone personas (  Tracey Lovejoy, 3:33 )
The Metro Design Language, the inspiration  ( Jeff Fong, 29:48)
Deconstructing a Windows Phone application part 1: Controls  (  Rhon Manlapaz,  Ryan Bickel, 17:40)
Deconstructing a Windows Phone application part2: Animation ( Jeff Arnold,  34:22 )
Deconstructing a Windows Phone application, part 3: Target Sizes (  Tirthankar Sengupta,  13:39 )
Deconstructing a Windows Phone application, part 4: Globalization (Ayman Raslan, Franklin Yow : 37:45 )
Deconstructing a Windows Phone application, part 6: Perceived performance  (19:45 )
Designer insights into Panorama and Pivot ( Chad Roberts, Amy Alberts, 32:18)
Making Audio Sing on Windows Phone (Matthew Bennett, 34:26 )
Windows Phone Voice ( Karen Kesler, 32:00 )
Designer Resources: Expression Blend Overview and Roadmap ( Celso Gomes, Peter Blois, 41:20 )
Designer Resources:  Windows Phone Documentation ( Chris Kilbourn, 11:18 )
Designer Resources: Windows Phone Design Templates ( Chad Roberts, 04:01 )

Via Windows Phone Design Day Recordings – Jaime Rodriguez – Site Home – MSDN Blogs

Panorama and Pivot controls for Windows Phone developers

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Panorama

Unlike standard applications that are designed to fit within the confines of the phone screen, these applications offer a unique way to view controls, data, and services by using a long horizontal canvas that extends beyond the confines of the screen.

Elements of a panoramic application serve as the starting point for more detailed experiences.

The background image is the lowest layer and is meant to give the panorama its rich magazine-like feel. Usually a full-bleed image, the background is potentially the most visual part of the application.

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Pivot control

The pivot control is a lot like the a tab control, but designed specifically for the phone and touch interaction. The entire pivot control (often the size of the screen and the root element on a page) can be panned, flicked, and manipulated – it’s not just about those headers (though those can be touched to navigate, too).

A pivot control provides a quick way to manage views or pages within the application. This control can be used for filtering large datasets, viewing multiple data sets, or switching application views. The control places individual views horizontally next to each other, and manages the left and right navigation. Flicking or panning horizontally on the page cycles the pivot functionality.

Read more -> Jeff Wilcox – Looking ahead: Panorama and Pivot controls for Windows Phone developers

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start Training

There are 12 sessions in total, each about :50 minutes in length. 

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 1 of 12): Introduction

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 2 of 12): Building a Silverlight Application, Part 1

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 3 of 12): Building a Silverlight Application, Part 2

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 4 of 12): Building Games for the Windows Phone 7 Platform

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 5 of 12): Building XNA Games for the Windows Phone 7 Platform, Part 1

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 6 of 12): Building XNA Games for the Windows Phone 7 Platform, Part 2

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 7 of 12): Advanced Application Development, Part 1

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 8 of 12): Advanced Application Development, Part 2

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 9 of 12): Advanced Application Development, Part 3

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 10 of 12): Marketing Your Windows Phone 7 Application

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 11 of 12): Working with Media

Windows Phone 7 Jump Start (Session 12 of 12): Final Silverlight Topics and Wrap-Up

 

Read more goto Windows Phone Developer Blog

How to avoid ‘Not Found’ Error when making WCF Service Calls in Silverlight

Have you seen this error message before?  “The remote server returned an error: NotFound.”, Not particularly helpful! This is your Silverlight app’s way of telling you that there was an exception during a WCF Service call. You can fix this with a little WCF server-side magic.  The magic is described in the Silverlight documentation in an entry called Creating and Handling Faults in Silverlight

Here’s the condensed version of the answer.  It all comes down to making your WCF service return a 200 HTTP Status code instead of the default of 400 or 500.  The modification on the server can be made by defining a WCF endpoint behavior for Silverlight faults by implementing the following:

public class SilverlightFaultBehavior : BehaviorExtensionElement, IEndpointBehavior
{…}
The above WCF endpoint behavior needs to be configured for in the WCF web.config
<system.serviceModel>
    <extensions>
      <behaviorExtensions>
        <add name=”silverlightFaults” 
             type=”Microsoft.Silverlight.Samples.SilverlightFaultBehavior, 
             SilverlightFaultBehavior, 
             Version=1.0.0.0, 
             Culture=neutral, 
             PublicKeyToken=null”/>
      </behaviorExtensions>
    </extensions>
    <behaviors>
        <endpointBehaviors>
          <behavior name=”SilverlightFaultBehavior”>
            <silverlightFaults/>
          </behavior>
        </endpointBehaviors>
    </behaviors>
    <services>
        <service name=”Calculator.Web.Service”>
            <endpoint address=”” 
                      binding=”basicHttpBinding” 
                      contract=”Calculator.Web.Service” 
                      behaviorConfiguration=”SilverlightFaultBehavior” />
</service>
  </services>
</system.serviceModel> 

 

Here is a little sample application.

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Click here to download the source code.

Via How to Permanently Banish Silverlight’s “Not Found” Error for WCF Service Calls